Faculty Advisory Council

Norweeta Milburn
Norweeta Milburn, PhD

Dr. Milburn received her PhD in Community Psychology from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). She is a Professor-in-Residence in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the UCLA Semel Insitute Center for Community Health and the Director of Research and Evaluation at the Nathanson Family Resilience Center, as well as a Fellow in the American Psychological Association (APA). Her areas of expertise and research interests include homelessness, substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, and family-centered behavioral interventions.  She has published a large number of journal articles and given many presentations on these topics.

During her research career, Dr. Milburn has investigated the ways in which homelessness occurs as well as HIV risk among homeless youth, both in the United States and abroad.  Dr. Milburn also served as a Co-Principal Investigator on U.S. Department of Education (DOE) and National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research examining mood disorders in African Americans and coping skills and adaptation. 

Recent Publications:
Lester, P., Liang, L. J., Milburn, N., Mogil, C., Woodward, K., Nash, W., ... & Beardslee, W. (2016). Evaluation of a family-centered preventive intervention for military families: Parent and child longitudinal outcomes. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 55(1), 14-24.
Lester, P., Stein, J. A., Saltzman, W., Woodward, K., MacDermid, S. W., Milburn, N., ... & Beardslee, W. (2013). Psychological health of military children: Longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience. Military Medicine, 178(8), 838.
Smiley, S. L., Elmasry, H., Hooper, M. W., Niaura, R. S., Hamilton, A. B., & Milburn, N. G. (2017). Feasibility of ecological momentary assessment of daily sexting and substance use among young adult African American gay and bisexual men: A pilot study. JMIR Research Protocols, 6(2).
Winetrobe, H., Rhoades, H., Rice, E., Milburn, N., & Petering, R. (2017). “I’m not homeless, I’m houseless”: Identifying as homeless and associations with service utilization among Los Angeles homeless young people. Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, 1-9.
Catherine Mogil
Catherine Mogil, PsyD

Dr. Mogil earned her doctorate from Pepperdine University in 2005. She is a licensed clinical psychologist and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior in the David Geffen School of Medicine.  In addition to her work with the Division, Dr. Mogil is also the Director of Training and Intervention Development for the Nathanson Family Resilience Center and the Director of the Family Development Project.  Dr. Mogil also serves as the Co-Director of the Child and Family Trauma Service and contributes to the UCLA Center for Child Anxiety Resilience Education and Support (CARES), a program that provides education and training on the early identification of childhood anxiety.

Dr. Mogil’s most recent research develops interventions for children and families experiencing stress and trauma.  She has worked with children from all developmental stages, including children with developmental disabilities, young children in foster care, children from military families, and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. 

Recent Publications:
Beardslee, W. R., Klosinski, L. E., Saltzman, W., Mogil, C., Pangelinan, S., McKnight, C. P., & Lester, P. (2013). Dissemination of family-centered prevention for military and veteran families: Adaptations and adoption within community and military systems of care. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 16(4), 394-409.
Lester, P., Liang, L. J., Milburn, N., Mogil, C., Woodward, K., Nash, W., ... & Beardslee, W. (2016). Evaluation of a family-centered preventive intervention for military families: Parent and child longitudinal outcomes. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 55(1), 14-24.
Mogil, C., Hajal, N., Garcia, E., Kiff, C., Paley, B., Milburn, N., & Lester, P. (2015). Focus for early childhood: A virtual home visiting program for military families with young children. Contemporary Family Therapy, 37(3), 199-208.
Paley, B., Lester, P., & Mogil, C. (2013). Family systems and ecological perspectives on the impact of deployment on military families. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 16(3), 245-265.
Blaire Paley
Blaire Paley, PhD

Dr. Paley received her doctorate in clinical psychology from UCLA. Dr. Paley serves as the Director of the Strategies for Enhancing Early Developmental Success (SEEDS) Program, Director of the Early Childhood Core for the Nathanson Family Resilience Center, and a Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.  Her research and clinical work aims to provide high quality prevention and intervention services for high-risk children and their families. Dr. Paley is the Principal Investigator of two research studies examining early childhood interventions for children with prenatal alcohol exposure and their families, one funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and one funded by the Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences. These studies both seek to improve child self-regulation, build parenting skills, and increase healthy parent and caregiver involvement in family functioning. Additionally, Dr. Paley has written numerous peer-reviewed journal articles on topics such as the psychological impact deployment has on military families.

Recent Publications:
Kable, J. A., O’Connor, M. J., Olson, H. C., Paley, B., Mattson, S. N., Anderson, S. M., & Riley, E. P. (2016). Neurobehavioral disorder associated with prenatal alcohol exposure (ND-PAE): Proposed DSM-5 diagnosis. Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 47(2), 335-346.
Lester, P., Paley, B., Saltzman, W., & Klosinski, L. E. (2013). Military service, war, and families: Considerations for child development, prevention and intervention, and public health policy—part 2. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 16(4), 345-347.
Mogil, C., Hajal, N., Garcia, E., Kiff, C., Paley, B., Milburn, N., & Lester, P. (2015). Focus for early childhood: A virtual home visiting program for military families with young children. Contemporary Family Therapy, 37(3), 199-208.
Paley, B., Lester, P., & Mogil, C. (2013). Family systems and ecological perspectives on the impact of deployment on military families. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 16(3), 245-265.
Samuel Skootsky
Samuel Skootsky, MD

Dr. Skootsky received his medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1979 and completed his Internship, Residency, and Fellowship at the UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Skootsky serves as the Chief Medical Officer for the UCLA Faculty Practice Group and Medical Group and is an Adjunct Professor of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Dr. Skootsky has worked tirelessly to redesign UCLA’s health care system and improve UCLA’s quality standards. He led the UCLA Primary Care Innovation Model (PICM) design and implementation.  In 2014, the Los Angeles Business Journal awarded Dr. Skootsky a Healthcare Leadership Award. Dr. Skootsky has written many peer-reviewed journal articles, and his research interests include accountable care, population health management, health care delivery improvement, advanced primary care, and enhancing the patient experience.

Recent Publications:
Clarke, R., Bharmal, N., Di Capua, P., Tseng, C. H., Mangione, C. M., Mittman, B., & Skootsky, S. A. (2015). Innovative approach to patient-centered care coordination in primary care practices. The American Journal of Managed Care, 21(9), 623-630.
Clarke, R., Hackbarth, A. S., Saigal, C., & Skootsky, S. A. (2015). Building the infrastructure for value at UCLA: Engaging clinicians and developing patient-centric measurement. Academic Medicine, 90(10), 1368-1372.
Clarke, R. M., Jeffrey, J., Grossman, M., Strouse, T., Gitlin, M., & Skootsky, S. A. (2016). Delivering on accountable care: Lessons from a behavioral health program to improve access and outcomes. Health Affairs, 35(8), 1487-1493.
Quigley, D. D., Elliott, M. N., Farley, D. O., Burkhart, Q., Skootsky, S. A., & Hays, R. D. (2014). Specialties differ in which aspects of doctor communication predict overall physician ratings. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29(3), 447-454.
Gary Small
Gary Small, MD

Dr. Gary Small is a Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, the Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the Director of the UCLA Longevity Center, and the Director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Division at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior. Dr. Small's team has developed brain imaging technologies that detect the first signs of Alzheimer's disease years before patients show symptoms. In addition to testing medicines for delaying the onset of Alzheimer's disease, Dr. Small has developed healthy aging lifestyle and memory training programs that are available throughout the U.S. and abroad in senior centers, community hospitals, and assisted living facilities. Dr. Small has authored over 400 scientific works and received numerous awards and honors, including the American College of Psychiatrist’s Research Award in Geriatric Psychiatry, and the American Psychiatric Association’s Weinberg Award for Excellence in Geriatric Psychiatry.   Scientific American magazine named him one of the world’s top 50 innovators in science and technology. He is the author of seven popular books, including The New York Times bestseller, The Memory Bible, and his most recent book, 2 Weeks to a Younger Brain.

Recent Publications:
Baerresen KM, Miller KJ, Hanson ER, Miller JS, Dye RV, Hartman RE, Vermeersch D, Small GW. Neuropsychological tests for predicting cognitive decline in older adults. Neurodegenerative Disease Management. 2015;5:191-201.
Bookheimer, SY, Renner BA, Ekstrom A, Li Z, Henning SM, Brown JA, Jones M, Moody T, Small GW. Pomegranate juice augments memory and fMRI activity in middle-aged and older adults with mild memory complaints. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2013;2013:946298. doi: 10.1155/2013/946298. Epub 2013 Jul 22.
Burggren AC, Bookheimer SY, Barrio JR, Small GW. Modifiable risk factors and brain positron emission tomography measures of amyloid and tau in nondemented adults with memory complaints. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2016 May 13. pii: S1064-7481(16)30112-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.05.007. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27421618.
Chen ST, Siddarth P, Ercoli LM, Merrill DA, Torres-Gil F, Small GW. Modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer disease and subjective memory impairment across age groups. PLOS ONE. 2014 Jun 4;9(6):e98630. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098630. eCollection 2014.
Curiel AR, Miller KJ, Pollard K, Kim J, Kravitz J, Small GW. Anxiety and verbal memory performance in APOE-4 carriers and non-carriers ages 50 and above. Aging Health. 2012;8:99-104.
Eyre HA, Van Dyk K, Siddarth P, St. Cyr N, Baune BT, Kepe V, Barrio J, Small G, Lavretsky H. Neural correlates of apathy in late-life depression: a pilot [18F]FDDNP PET study. Psychogeriatrics (in press).
Harrison T, Mahmood Z, Lau E, Karacozoff A, Burggren A, Small G, Bookheimer S. An Alzheimer's disease genetic risk score predicts longitudinal thinning of hippocampal complex subregions in healthy older adults. eNeuro. DOI: 10.1523/ENEURO.0098-16.2016.
Huang S-C, Barrio JR. Prediction of cognitive decline by positron emission tomography of brain amyloid and tau. Archives of Neurology 2012;69:215-222.
Kaiser NC, Miller KJ, Siddarth P, Ercoli LM, Small GW. The impact of age and Alzheimer’s disease risk factors on memory performance over time. Aging Health. 2013;9:1-10.
Kumar A, Kepe V, Barrio JR, Siddarth P, Manoukian V, Elderkin-Thompson V, Small GW. Protein binding in patients with late-life depression. Archives of General Psychiatry. 2011;68:1143-1150.
Lee GJ, Curiel AR, Miller KJ, Amano S, Gorsuch R, Small GW. Language performance in postmenopausal women with and without hormone therapy and men. Aging Health 2012;8; 625-632.
Merrill DA, Siddarth P, Kepe V, Raja PV, Saito N, Ercoli LM, Miller KJ, Lavretsky H, Bookheimer SY, Barrio JR, Small GW. Vascular risk and FDDNP-PET influence cognitive performance. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. 2013:35;147-157.
Merrill DA, Siddarth P, Saito NY, Ercoli LM, Burggren AC, Kepe V, Lavretsky H, Miller KJ, Kim J, Huang SC, Bookheimer SY, Barrio JR, Small GW. Self-reported memory impairment and brain PET of amyloid and tau in middle-aged and older adults without dementia. Self-reported memory impairment and brain PET of amyloid and tau in middle-aged and older adults without dementia. International Psychogeriatrics. 2012;24:1076-84.
Merrill DA, Siddarth, P, Raji CA, Emerson ND, Rueda F, Ercoli LM, Miller KJ, Lavretsky H, Harris LM,
Miller KJ, Siddarth P, Gaines JM, Parrish JM, Ercoli LM, Marx K, Ronch J, Pilgrim B, Burke K, Barczak N, Babcock B, Small GW. The Memory Fitness Program: Cognitive effects of a healthy aging intervention. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 2012;20:514-23.
Raji CA, Merrill DA, Barrio JR, Omalu B, Small GW. Progressive focal gray matter volume loss in a former high school football player: A possible magnetic resonance imaging volumetric signature for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2016. Jul 28. pii: S1064-7481(16)30196-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.07.018.
Roussotte FF, Hua X, Narr KL, Small GW, Thompson PM; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The C677T variant in MTHFR modulates associations between brain integrity, mood, and cognitive functioning in old age. Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging. 2017 Apr;2(3):280-288.
Sirovatka PJ, Regier DA (eds): Diagnostic Issues in Dementia: Advancing the Research Agenda for DSM-V. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 2007.
Small GW, Greenfield S.  Current and future treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.  American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2015;11:1101-5.
Small GW, Kepe V, Barrio JR. Seeing is believing: Neuroimaging adds to our understanding of cerebral pathology. Current Opinion in Psychiatry 2006;19:564-569.
Small GW, Kepe V, Ercoli LM, Siddarth P, Miller K, Bookheimer SY, Lavretsky H, Burggren AC, Cole G, Vinters HV, Thompson PM, Huang S-C, Satyamurthy N, Phelps ME, Barrio JR. PET of brain amyloid and tau in mild cognitive impairment. New England Journal of Medicine 2006;355;2652-2663.
Small GW, Kepe V, Siddarth P, Ercoli LM, Merrill DA, Donoghue N, Bookheimer SY, Martinez J, Omalu B, Bailes J, Barrio JR. PET scanning of brain tau in retired National Football League Players. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2013;21:138-144.
Small GW, Moody TD, Siddarth P, Bookheimer SY. Your brain on Google: Patterns of cerebral activation during Internet searching. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 2009;17:116-126.
Small GW, Siddarth P, Burggren AC, Kepe V, Ercoli LM, Miller KJ, Lavretsky H, Thompson PM, Cole GM, Huang S-C, Phelps ME, Bookheimer SY, Barrio JR. Influence of cognitive status, age, and APOE-4 genetic risk on brain FDDNP positron-emission tomography imaging in persons without dementia. Archives of General Psychiatry 2009;66:81-87.
Small GW, Siddarth P, Ercoli LM, Chen ST, Merrill DA, Torres-Gil F. Healthy behavior and memory self-reports in young, middle-aged and older adults. International Psychogeriatrics 2013;25:981-989.
Small GW, Siddarth P, Kepe V, Ercoli LM, Burggren AC, Bookheimer SY, Miller KJ, Kim J, Lavretsky H,
Small GW, Silverman DHS, Siddarth P, Ercoli LM, Miller KJ, Wright BC, Bookheimer SY, Barrio JR, Phelps ME. Effects of a 14-day healthy longevity lifestyle program on cognition and brain function. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 2006;14:538-545.
Small GW. Detection and prevention of cognitive decline. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2016 Aug 25. pii: S1064-7481(16)30220-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.08.013. [Epub ahead of print].
Small GW. Diagnostic issues in dementia: Neuroimaging as a surrogate marker of disease. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology 2006; 19:180-185 [reprinted in Sunderland T, Jeste D, Baiyewu O,
Thomas Strouse
Thomas Strouse, MD

Dr. Strouse serves as the Medical Director of the Stewart and Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA as well as a Fellow of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He has served for 10 years as a member, and for the last 3 years as Chair of the Test Writing Committee for Hospice and Palliative Care, which produces the board certifying exam for the field of palliative medicine. Dr. Strouse’s primary interests lie in the psychiatric considerations of medical illness and pain management, as well as palliative and supportive care.  A passionate clinician-teacher, Dr. Strouse lectures and presents across the nation. 

Dr. Strouse has received a large number of awards and distinctions during his career, including the Robert T. Angarola Award from the Southern California Cancer Pain Initiative and a Top Course Director award from psychiatry residents.  In 2010, he was named the Maddie Katz Chair in Palliative Care Research and Education.  Dr. Strouse has many scientific article and book chapter publications and serves as associate editor of the Journal of Palliative Medicine and the Journal of Supportive Oncology. 

Recent publications:
Clarke, R. M., Jeffrey, J., Grossman, M., Strouse, T., Gitlin, M., & Skootsky, S. A. (2016). Delivering on accountable care: Lessons from a behavioral health program to improve access and outcomes. Health Affairs,35(8), 1487-1493. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2015.1263
Strouse, T. (2013). Palliative medicine and psychiatry: A reply. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 16(10), 1166-1167.
Strouse, T. B. (2013). Psychopharmacologic treatment of depression in patients with cancer: A 2013 update. Focus, 11(4), 450-459.
Strouse, T. B. (2016). Cannabinoids in Medical Practice. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 1(1), 38-43.
Strouse TB.  Oncology Clinicians Should Understand End-of-life options including legal pathways to physician aid in dying. J Commun and Support Oncol. 2017;15(1):1-3
Strouse TB.  Editor’s Reply:  Toxic Abandonment and the case against physician participation in aid in dying.  J Commun Support Oncol  2017;15(2):122-124.
Strouse TB.  Cannabinoids in Palliative Medicine.  J Pall Med 2017; in press
Margaret Stuber
Margaret Stuber, MD

Dr. Stuber received her medical training at the University of Michigan in 1979. She serves as the Director of the Office of Education for Mental Health for the Greater Los Angeles VA, and as Professor and Associate Chair for Medical Student Education for the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. She has been creating curriculum for medical education for over twenty years. She is an educational consultant for the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, creating curriculum to teach clinicians how to improve care of traumatized children.  She is also a part of the Center of Excellence at the West LA VA in development of interprofessional training for those providing integrated primary care and mental health services to homeless veterans.  

Recent Publications:
Supelana C, Annunziato RA, Kaplan D, Helcer J, Stuber ML, Shemesh E. (2016) PTSD in solid organ transplant recipients: Current understanding and future implications. Pediatr Transplant.  2016 Feb;20(1):23-33. doi: 10.1111/petr.12628. Review.PMID:26648058 
Smith SD, Dunham L, Dekhtyar M, Dinh A, Lanken PN, Moynahan KF, Stuber ML, Skochelak SE. (2016) Medical Student Perceptions of the Learning Environment: Learning Communities Are Associated With a More Positive Learning Environment in a Multi-Institutional Medical School Study. Academic Medicine.  PMID:27119332
West C, Graham L, Palmer RT, Miller MF, Thayer EK, Stuber ML, Awdishu L, Umoren RA, Wamsley MA, Nelson EA,  Joo PA, Tysinger JW, George P, Carney PA. (2016) Implementation of Interprofessional Education (IPE) in 16 U.S. Medical Schools: Common Practices, Barriers and Facilitators. Journal of Interprofessional Education and Practice Sep;4:41-49. doi: 10.1016/j.xjep.2016.05.002.
Pololi L, Nickell L, Reboli AC, Coplit LC, Stuber ML,  Vasilou V, Civian JT, Evans AT, Brennan RT, (2017) Assessing the learning environment for medical students: an evaluation of a novel survey instrument in four medical schools.  Academic Psychiatry. Jun;41(3):354-359. doi: 10.1007/s40596-016-0620-1. Epub 2016 Nov 10.
Dunham L, Dekhtyar M, Gruener G, Cichoski-Kelly E, Deitz J, Elliott D, Stuber ML, Skochelak S. (2017) Medical student perceptions of the learning environment in medical school change as students’ transition to clinical training in undergraduate medical school. Teach Learn Med. Mar 20:1-9. doi: 10.1080/10401334.2017.129771
Rosenbluth SC, Freymiller EG, Hemphill R, Paull DE, Stuber M, Friedlander AH. Resident Well-Being and Patient Safety: Recognizing the Signs and Symptoms of Burnout. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Apr;75(4):657-659. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2016.11.029. Epub 2016 Dec 11.
Layne, C.M., Abramovitz, R. Stuber, M., Ross, L., & Strand, V. (2017). The Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma: A tool for preparing a trauma-informed mental health workforce. Invited paper for Clinician's Corner section of the ISTSS Traumatic StressPoints Quarterly.
Kenneth Wells
Kenneth Wells, MD, MPH

Dr. Wells received his MD from the University of California, San Francisco and his MPH from UCLA.  He is the David Weil Endowed Chair and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine and in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Fielding School of Public Health. He is also Affiliated Adjunct Staff of the RAND Corporation. Dr. Wells also serves as the academic Principal Investigator (PI) of Community Partners in Care (CPIC), funded by the NIMH and NIMHD and of the PCORI-funded Community and Patient Partnered Research Network. His research investigates how best to reduce barriers and disparities in access to treatment for depression, especially through community-partnered initiatives. He was co-director of Mental Health Infrastructure and Training (MHIT) Project, an American Red Cross grant for post-Katrina mental health recovery in New Orleans, and is supporting a similar effort funded through Baton Rouge Area Foundation and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for mental health recovery post-floods in Baton Rouge.

As Associate Director of the National Clinician Scholars Program, Dr. Wells trains new generations of clinicians on participatory health services research methods and the fundamentals of community engagement.

Dr. Wells has received numerous awards, including the American Psychiatric Association’s Research Prize for lifetime achievement and the Young Investigator Award and he was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and recently received together with over 100 community and academic partners the Association of Clinical and Translational Science 2014 Team Science Award and Campus-Community Partnerships for Health 2015 Annual Award . Dr. Wells is also an accomplished choral director and composer. He founded the Media and Medicine for Communities program at UCLA in an effort to bring the arts, media, and health communication together.

 

Recent Publications:
Barnert, E. S., Raymond Perry MD, M. S. H. S., & Wells, K. B. (2014). Reforming healthcare for former prisoners. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29(8), 1093.
Bromley, E., Jones, L., Rosenthal, M. S., Heisler, M., Sochalski, J., Koniak-Griffin, D., ... & Wells, K. B. (2015). The national clinician scholars program: Teaching transformational leadership and promoting health justice through community-engaged research ethics. AMA Journal of Ethics, 17(12), 1127.
Lam, C. A., Sherbourne, C., Tang, L., Belin, T. R., Williams, P., Young-Brinn, A., ... & Wells, K. B. (2016). The impact of community engagement on health, social, and utilization outcomes in depressed, impoverished populations: Secondary findings from a randomized trial. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 29(3), 325-338.
Stockdale, S. E., Tang, L., Pudilo, E., Lucas-Wright, A., Chung, B., Horta, M., ... & Wells, K. (2016). Sampling and recruiting community-based programs using community-partnered participation research. Health Promotion Practice, 17(2), 254-264.
plester
Patricia Lester, MD

Dr. Lester is the Jane and Marc Nathanson Family Professor of Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine, where she directs the Division of Population Behavioral Health within the Department of Psychiatry.  She also serves as the Director of the Nathanson Family Resilience Center, Medical Director of the Family Stress, Trauma and Resilience Service (STAR), Co-Director of the Center for Child Anxiety Resilience Education and Support, and the founding leadership team for the Pritzker Center for Strengthening Children and Families.  Dr. Lester has sustained a career-long focus on developing and disseminating preventive interventions, practices, and policies that to support child and family resilience in the context of trauma and adversity.   Her research and leadership has focused on the study of translational and implementation processes needed to bring evidence based prevention to scale within systems of care and community settings

Recent Publications:
Wadsworth, S. M., Cardin, J. F., Christ, S., Willerton, E., O'Grady, A. F., Topp, D., ... & Mustillo, S. (2016). Accumulation of Risk and Promotive Factors Among Young Children in US Military Families. American journal of community psychology, 57(1-2), 190-202.
Lester, P., Liang, L. J., Milburn, N., Mogil, C., Woodward, K., Nash, W., ... & Beardslee, W. (2016). Evaluation of a family-centered preventive intervention for military families: parent and child longitudinal outcomes. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 55(1), 14-24
Mustillo, S., Wadsworth, S. M., & Lester, P. (2016). Parental Deployment and Well-Being in Children Results From a New Study of Military Families.Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 24(2), 82-91.
Ward, M. J., Carlson, E. A., Lester, P., Beckwith, L., Sigman, M., & Rotheram-Borus, M. J. (2016). Child–mother attachments in the face of grandparent HIV. Attachment & Human Development, 18(5), 461-472.
Lester, P., Aralis, H., Sinclair, M., Kiff, C., Lee, K. H., Mustillo, S., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2016). The Impact of Deployment on Parental, Family and Child Adjustment in Military Families. Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 1-12.
Saltzman, W. R., Lester, P., Milburn, N., Woodward, K., & Stein, J. (2016). Pathways of Risk and Resilience: Impact of a Family Resilience Program on Active‐Duty Military Parents. Family Process.
Garcia, E., Wijesekera, K., & Lester, P. (2017). A Family-Centered Preventive Intervention Within Pediatric Oncology: Adapting the FOCUS Intervention for Latino Youth and Their Families. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 1-18.
Ijadi-Maghsoodi, R., Marlotte, L., Garcia, E., Aralis, H., Lester, P., Escudero, P., & Kataoka, S. (2017). Adapting and Implementing a School-Based Resilience-Building Curriculum among Low-Income Racial and Ethnic Minority Students. Contemporary School Psychology, 1-17.
Wijesekera, K., Emerson, N., Sinclair, M., Lester, P. (2017). FOCUS for Pediatric Heart Transplant: A Trauma-Informed, Family-Centered, Resilience Enhancing Intervention (Abstract). Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, 36(4), S175.
Lester, P, Rausch P, Louckes, L, Sornborger J, Ohye B, & Karnik N. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Military-Connected Families: The Relevance of a Family-Centered Approach. Focus, 2017, in press.
Jeffrey, J., Sinclair, M., Linonis, R., Semaan, A., Hsiao, T. Chiu, W., Grossman, M., Lester, P. Integration of a Web-based Behavioral Health Assessment within a Collaborative Care Setting. Journal of Mobile Technology in Medicine, 2017, in press.
Nguyen, J, Lester, P, Jeffrey, J. Internet CBT: Basics for the Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist. Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2017, in press.
Bursch B, Lloyd J, Mogil C, Wijesekera K, Miotto K, Wu M, Wilkinson R, Klomhaus A, Iverson A, Lester P. Adaptation and Evaluation of Military Resilience Skills Training for Pediatric Residents. Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development. 2017,in press.
JessicaJeffrey
Jessica Jeffrey, MD, MPH, MBA

Dr. Jeffrey is a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. She is the Associate Director of Ambulatory Services within the UCLA Department of Psychiatry and she also serves as the Associate Director of the Division of Population Behavioral Health at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. Additionally, Dr. Jeffrey is the Lead Child Psychiatrist at UCLA Behavioral Health Associates. Dr. Jeffrey has published articles in the fields of psychiatry and health care systems, spanning topics including integrated behavioral healthcare, anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, and quality of life in depression. Dr. Jeffrey is interested in systems of health care delivery, quality improvement and family resilience. She also has a strong interest in advocacy for improved child and adolescent behavioral health.

Recent publications: 
Jeffrey, J. Quality improvement in resident education: a pilot project to mitigate metabolic side effects from atypical antipsychotic medications in youth. BMJ Qual Improv Report 2015;4:1-6. doi:10.1136/bmjquality.u208804.w3544.
Sidhu, S, Jeffrey, J. “Contract Negotiation for Academic Psychiatrists", Academic Psychiatry. 2016. DOI 10.1007/s40596-016-0513-3.
Jeffrey, J, Martini R. “Behavioral Health Integration within Primary Care: A Primer”. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Connect. 2015; Fall;2(4):14-17.
Clarke, R, Jeffrey, J, Grossman, M, Strouse, T, Gitlin M, Skootsky S. “Delivering on Accountable Care: Lessons from a Population-Based Behavioral Health Program to Improve Access and Outcomes", Health Affairs 35(8) August 2016, 1487-1493.
Jeffrey, J, Martini R. “Skills for the Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist Within the Pediatric Primary Care Setting”. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Connect. 2016; Summer: 9-14.
aarevian
Armen Arevian, MD, PhD

Dr. Arevian is an Assistant Professor-in-Residence in the Department of Psychiatry at UCLA, the Director of the Innovation Lab at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, and the Director of the Translational Technology and Communications Core at the California Center of Excellence in Behavioral Health.  He also serves as the Director of Consultation-Liaison and Telepsychiatry at UCLA’s Santa Monica Hospital.  Dr. Arevian focuses on translational research and discovering new “behavioral biomarkers,” objective measures of mental and physical functioning obtained via behavioral evaluations, to predict health outcomes. 

In addition, Dr. Arevian developed a web application called “Chorus Participatory Mobile Framework” that easily and quickly helps patients customize their own mobile health app.  He is dedicated to developing personalized health care and increasing access to services by thinking outside of the traditional box.  In 2012, he received the APA Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators Award. 

Recent Publications:
Hassanpour, M. S., Yan, L., Wang, D. J., Lapidus, R. C., Arevian, A. C., Simmons, W. K., ... & Khalsa, S. S. (2016). How the heart speaks to the brain: Neural activity during cardiorespiratory interoceptive stimulation. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 371(1708), 20160017.
jasarnow
Joan Asarnow, PhD

Dr. Joan Asarnow is a Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA and Director of the UCLA Youth Stress and Mood Program, a depression and suicide prevention program with clinical, educational, and research components.  Dr. Asarnow has led efforts to develop and evaluate integrated medical-behavioral health care strategies for youths, with an emphasis on evidence-based treatments for youth depression and suicide and self-harm prevention.  She received the 2017 Research Award from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention for her work developing and evaluating treatment and service delivery strategies for youths suffering with suicidal and self-harm behaviors and currently leads two major federally funded programs: 1) a large NIMH-funded randomized controlled trial, with Kaiser Permanente Research Foundation, evaluating a stepped care intervention for adolescents and young adults aimed at advancing the goal of zero suicide within a large health system; and 2) the UCLA-Duke Center for Trauma-Informed Adolescent Suicide, Self-Harm & Substance Abuse Prevention.  Two programs developed by Dr. Asarnow are listed in the National Registry for Evidence-Based Programs (SAMHSA): 1) the Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention, a crisis treatment for youths after a suicidal/self-harm episode; and 2) Depression Treatment Quality Improvement, an evidence-based depression treatment program that has been integrated within primary care, mental health, and other settings. Dr. Asarnow has received grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, Centers for Disease Control, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and other organizations.  She currently serves on the Scientific Council of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the Scientific Advisory Board of the Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation.

Publications:
1. Asarnow JR, Kolko DJ, Miranda J, Kazak AE. The Pediatric Patient-Centered
Medical Home: Innovative models for improving behavioral health. Am Psychol. 2017. Jan;72(1):13-27. doi: 10.1037/a0040411. PubMed PMID: 28068135.
2. Asarnow JR, Rozenman M, Wiblin J, Zeltzer L. Integrated Medical-Behavioral
Care Compared With Usual Primary Care for Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health: A Meta-analysis. JAMA Pediatr. 2015 Oct;169(10):929-37. doi:
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.1141. PubMed PMID: 26259143.
3. Asarnow JR, Jaycox LH, Duan N, LaBorde AP, Rea MM, Murray P, Anderson M,
Landon C, Tang L, Wells KB. Effectiveness of a quality improvement intervention for adolescent depression in primary care clinics: a randomized controlled trial.JAMA. 2005 Jan 19;293(3):311-9. PubMed PMID: 15657324.
4. Asarnow JR, Zeledon LR, D'Amico E, LaBorde A, Anderson M, Avina C, Arslanian T, Do MC, Harwood J, Shoptaw S. Depression and Health Risk Behaviors: Towards Optimizing Primary Care Service Strategies for Addressing Risk. Prim Health Care. 2014 Mar 1;4(1):152. PubMed PMID: 25309826; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4189940.
5. Asarnow JR, Hughes JL, Babeva KN, Sugar CA. Cognitive-Behavioral Family
Treatment for Suicide Attempt Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial. J Am
Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017 Jun;56(6):506-514. doi:
10.1016/j.jaac.2017.03.015. Epub 2017 Apr 5. PubMed PMID: 28545756; PubMed
Central PMCID: PMC5474088.
rbilder
Robert Bilder, PhD

Dr. Bilder is the Michael E. Tennenbaum Family Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine and a Professor of Psychology at UCLA’s College of Letters and Science. Dr. Bilder also serves as Director of the Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity, the Semel Institute Translational Research Center for Neuropsychiatry, and the UCLA Healthy Campus Initiative’s Mind Well program. He is additionally the Chief of Medical Psychology-Neuropsychology for the Semel Institute, Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital. Dr. Bilder’s research is dedicated to understanding the brain mechanisms underlying mental disorders, healthy cognition, and exceptional creative abilities. Continuously supported over the last 30 years by grants from multiple NIH institutes, foundations, and philanthropy, Dr. Bilder has published more than 200 articles, presented his work more than 500 times, and received numerous awards and honors.

Recent Publications:
Bilder, R. M., Sabb, F. W., Cannon, T. D., London, E. D., Jentsch, J. D., Parker, D. S., ... & Freimer, N. B. (2009). Phenomics: The systematic study of phenotypes on a genome-wide scale. Neuroscience, 164(1), 30-42.
Cohen, J. R., Asarnow, R. F., Sabb, F. W., Bilder, R. M., Bookheimer, S. Y., Knowlton, B. J., & Poldrack, R. A. (2010). A unique adolescent response to reward prediction errors. Nature Neuroscience, 13(6), 669-671.
Kaufman, D. A. S., Boxer, O., & Bilder, R. M. (2013). Evidence-based science and practice in neuropsychology: A review. Neuropsychology Science and Practice, 1-38.
Keefe, R. S., Bilder, R. M., Davis, S. M., Harvey, P. D., Palmer, B. W., Gold, J. M., ... & McEvoy, J. P. (2007). Neurocognitive effects of antipsychotic medications in patients with chronic schizophrenia in the CATIE Trial. Archives of General Psychiatry, 64(6), 633-647.
Lee, B., London, E. D., Poldrack, R. A., Farahi, J., Nacca, A., Monterosso, J. R., ... & Bilder, R. M. (2009). Striatal dopamine d2/d3 receptor availability is reduced in methamphetamine dependence and is linked to impulsivity. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(47), 14734-14740.
bbursch
Brenda Bursch, PhD

Medical psychologist Dr. Bursch earned her PhD from Claremont Graduate School. Since 1994, Dr. Bursch has served as a Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, and Pediatrics at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine.  She is Clinical Director of the Pediatric Psychiatry Consultation Liaison service.  Dr. Bursch has clinical and research interests in high utilizers of health care services, including topics such as pediatric chronic pain and disability, palliative care, somatization, and illness falsification. She is also developing mental wellness programs and tools designed for healthcare workers.

Recent Publications (2013 -   ):
• Bursch, B., Fried, J.M., Wimmers, P.F., Cook, I.A., Baillie, S., Zackson, H, Stuber. M.L. (2013).  Relationship between Medical Student Perceptions of Mistreatment and Mistreatment Sensitivity.  Medical Teacher. 35(3):e998-1002.
• Forgey, M., Bursch, B. (2013).  Assessment and Management of Pediatric Iatrogenic Medical Trauma. Current Psychiatry Reports, 15(2):340.
• Bursch, B., Forgey, M. (2013).  Psychopharmacology for Medically Ill Adolescents. Current Psychiatry Reports. Oct;15(10):395.
• Bursch, B. (2014). Munchausen by Proxy and Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another.  Psychiatric Times. Aug;31(8):16-27.
• Forgey, M., Bursch, B. (2014).  Psychopharmacology in Oncology and Palliative Care:  Childhood and Adolescence.  In Luigi Grassi & Michelle Riba (Editors) Clinical Psychopharmacology for Oncology and Palliative Care: A Practical Manual.  Springer.
Erick Cheung, MD

Cheung received his medical degree in 2007 from Albany Medical College with a distinction in biomedical ethics. Dr. Cheung completed his adult psychiatry residency at UCLA, where he served as chief resident in 2010. He is Assistant Professor of Health Sciences at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Medical Director of the UCLA Psychiatric Emergency Services, and Chief Quality Officer of the UCLA Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital. Cheung is appointed to the LA County Emergency Medical Services Commission where he presently serves as chair. His research interests include emergency psychiatry, ethics, and neuroethics and he has authored many academic journals on these topics. Dr. Cheung has received numerous awards and distinctions across his career, including the Residents’ Award from the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry in 2011 and the Presidential Award from the Southern California Psychiatric Society in 2010.

Recent Publications:
Blair, T., Wiener, Z., Seroussi, A., Tang, L., O’Hora, J., & Cheung, E. (2017). Resident workflow and psychiatric emergency consultation: Identifying factors for quality improvement in a training environment. Academic Psychiatry, 41(3), 377-380.
Cheung, E. H. (2009). A new ethics of psychiatry: Neuroethics, neuroscience, and technology. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 15(5), 391-401.
Cheung, E. H., & Pierre, J. M. (2015). The medical ethics of cognitive neuroenhancement. AIMS Neuroscience, 2, 102-122.
tfong
Timothy Fong, MD

Dr. Fong received his MD from Northwestern University in 1998.  Currently, he is an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, as well as the Director of the UCLA Impulse Control Disorders clinic.  Moreover, he is a Co-Director of the UCLA Gambling Studies Program, which conducts research to investigate the causes of pathological gambling, utilizes evidence-based interventions, and provides education to the community.  In his roles as Director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic and Program Director for the UCLA Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship, Dr. Fong trains others in addiction psychiatry. 

Dr. Fong has numerous publications on topics such as addiction among Asian-Americans, the management of compulsive sexual behaviors, and the different types of psychotherapy treatments available for pathological gamblers. 

Recent Publications:
Moholy, M., Prause, N., Proudfit, G. H., S. Rahman, A., & Fong, T. (2015). Sexual desire, not hypersexuality, predicts self-regulation of sexual arousal. Cognition and Emotion, 29(8), 1505-1516.
Parhami, I., Mojtabai, R., Rosenthal, R. J., Afifi, T. O., & Fong, T. W. (2014). Gambling and the onset of comorbid mental disorders: A longitudinal study evaluating severity and specific symptoms. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 20(3), 207-219.
Reid, R. C., Cyders, M. A., Moghaddam, J. F., & Fong, T. W. (2014). Psychometric properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in patients with gambling disorders, hypersexuality, and methamphetamine dependence. Addictive Behaviors, 39(11), 1640-1645.
Steele, V. R., Staley, C., Fong, T., & Prause, N. (2013). Sexual desire, not hypersexuality, is related to neurophysiological responses elicited by sexual images. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3.
mforgeyborlik
Marcy Forgey Borlik, MD, MPH

Dr. Forgey Borlik received both her MD and MPH from Northwestern University.  She is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the UCLA Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the Associate Training Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Program.  In addition, she serves as the Medical Director of the Pediatric Consultation Liaison Psychiatry Service. 

Dr. Forgey Borlik’s research focuses on psychiatric problems in medically ill children, mood disorders, and the efficacy of family-centered interventions for vulnerable young people.  She advocates for the importance and promotion of youth mental health and is board certified in both adult and child and adolescent psychiatry. 

Recent Publications:
Borlik, M. F., Pope, K., Benton, T. D., Koss, D. E., & Sharma, N. (2016). Contract negotiations: Specific concerns for women psychiatrists throughout the course of their careers. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 55(10), S348.
Bursch, B., & Forgey, M. (2013). Psychopharmacology for medically ill adolescents. Current Psychiatry Reports, 15(10), 395.
Forgey, M., & Bursch, B. (2013). Assessment and management of pediatric iatrogenic medical trauma. Current Psychiatry Reports, 15(2), 1-9.
Forgey, M., & Bursch, B. (2014). Psychopharmacology in palliative care and oncology: Childhood and adolescence. Psychopharmacology in Oncology and Palliative Care (pp. 331-348). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
mgitlin
Michael Gitlin, MD

Psychiatrist Dr. Gitlin completed his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine in 1975.  Dr. Gitlin is a Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine, the Director of the Adult Division in the Department of Psychiatry, and the Director of the Mood Disorders Clinic at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital. 

Dr. Gitlin has received numerous awards across his career, including the Dadone Clinical Teaching Award from the David Geffen School of Medicine and the Teacher of the Year Award from Psychiatric Times.  He has published many journal articles, book chapters, and books, including co-authoring the Clinician’s Guide to Bipolar Disorder. Dr. Gitlin has extensive experience in many fields, including the treatment of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. 

Recent Publications:
Altshuler, L. L., Sugar, C. A., McElroy, S. L., Calimlim, B., Gitlin, M., Keck Jr, P. E., ... & Roach, J. (2017). Switch rates during acute treatment for bipolar II depression with lithium, sertraline, or the two combined: A randomized double-blind comparison. American Journal of Psychiatry, 174(3), 266-276.
Clarke, R. M., Jeffrey, J., Grossman, M., Strouse, T., Gitlin, M., & Skootsky, S. A. (2016). Delivering on accountable care: Lessons from a behavioral health program to improve access and outcomes. Health Affairs,35(8), 1487-1493. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2015.1263
Reid, J. G., Gitlin, M. J., & Altshuler, L. L. (2013). Lamotrigine in psychiatric disorders. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 74(7), 675-684.
Ventura, J., Subotnik, K. L., Gitlin, M. J., Gretchen-Doorly, D., Ered, A., Villa, K. F., ... & Nuechterlein, K. H. (2015). Negative symptoms and functioning during the first year after a recent onset of schizophrenia and 8 years later. Schizophrenia Research, 161(2), 407-413.
cgrella
Christine Grella, PhD

Christine E. Grella, Ph.D., is Professor-in-Residence in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles and Co-Director of the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP). She received her doctorate in Social Psychology from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1985. Dr. Grella has over 25 years of experience conducting research on substance use among youth and adults. Her research has focused on service access, utilization, and outcomes of participation in multiple service delivery systems, including substance use disorder treatment, mental health, child welfare, health services, HIV services, and criminal justice. She has led several longitudinal cohort studies, conducted over a dozen evaluation studies of treatment interventions for individuals with substance use and/or mental health disorders, and conducted epidemiological studies using national survey data. Currently, Dr. Grella is Principal Investigator of the pre- and postdoctoral training program in Addiction Health Services Research at the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP; NIDA T32 DA007272), PI of the Evaluation of SAMHSA’s Bridges to Recovery, Hope, and Home Project (CLARE Foundation T20063816), Co-Investigator and Director of the Research and Methods Support Core of the Center on Advancing Longitudinal Drug Abuse Research (CALDAR; NIDA P30 DA016383), Co-Investigator of the UCLA-Cairo University Addiction Unit Research Training Program (Fogarty International Center D43 TW009102), and Co-Investigator on SBIRT for Substance Abuse in Mental Health Treatment Settings (NIDA R01 DA032733). She was Principal Investigator of Gender Differences in a Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Opiate Users in California (NIDA R01 DA015390) and Co-Principal Investigator on the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies – Adolescents (DATOS-A; NIDA U01 DA10378). The findings from her research have been widely published in the areas of addiction, mental health, health services, and evaluation research.  Dr. Grella also serves as a reviewer for NIH/NIDA and on several advisory boards for community organizations.

Recent Publications:
Grella, C.E. (2008). From generic to gender-responsive treatment: Changes in social policies, treatment services, and outcomes of women in substance abuse treatment. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, SARC Supplement 5, 327-343.
Grella, C.E., Hser, Y.I., Joshi, V., & Rounds-Bryant, J. (2001). Drug treatment outcomes for adolescents with comorbid mental and substance use disorders. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 189(6), 384-392.
Grella, C.E., Karno, M.P., Warda, U.S., Moore, A.A., & Niv, N. (2009).  Perceptions of need and help received for substance dependence in a national probability survey. Psychiatric Services, 60(8), 1068-1074.
Grella, C.E., & Lovinger, K. (2012). Gender differences in physical and mental health outcomes among an aging cohort of individuals with a history of heroin dependence. Addictive Behaviors, 37(3), 306-212.
Grella, C.E., & Lovinger, K. (2011). Thirty-year trajectories of heroin and other drug use among men and women sampled from methadone treatment in California. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 118, 251-258.
mgrossman
Mark Grossman, MD, MBA

Dr. Grossman received his MD from Loyola University of Chicago in 1993 and his MBA from UCLA in 2002. Dr. Grossman is the Vice Chair fo the Department of Medicine for the UCLA Community Physicians Network and is Clinical Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. His areas of expertise as a primary care physician include geriatric medicine, newborn care, and preventative medicine. Dr. Grossman educates medical students and residents and has received many awards, including the Golden Apple Teaching Award as a UCLA Med-Peds Attending. Dr. Grossman’s research interests include improving behavioral health outcomes and he earned a Certificate of Appreciation for his volunteer contributions to the Venice Family Clinic. 

Recent Publications:
Clarke, R. M., Jeffrey, J., Grossman, M., Strouse, T., Gitlin, M., & Skootsky, S. A. (2016). Delivering on accountable care: Lessons from a behavioral health program to improve access and outcomes. Health Affairs, 35(8), 1487-1493.
RIjadi-Maghsood
Roya Ijadi-Maghsoodi, MD

Dr. Ijadi-Maghsoodi received her MD from the University of Iowa College of Medicine in 2009 and completed her internship, adult psychiatry residency, and fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital. She completed an Advanced Fellowship in Women's Health, a UCLA/VA health services research fellowship in 2016, and also obtained a masters of science degree in Health Policy and Management from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. She is a Psychiatrist and Health Services Researcher at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and an Assistant Professor-in-Residence in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Her specialties include child and adolescent psychiatry, community psychiatry, trauma, and vulnerable populations. Her research focuses on improving care in the community for under-resourced populations with trauma, including homeless veteran families, and high-risk youth. She has published journal articles on topics such as school-based mental health, commercial sexual exploitation of children, and implementing a trauma-informed resilience curriculum in schools. Dr. Ijadi-Maghsoodi received an AACAP NIDA Physician Scientist Program in Substance Abuse K12 Award to focus on improving care for homeless families affected by parental substance use disorders.

 

Recent Publications:
Ijadi-Maghsoodi, R., Marlotte, L., Garcia, E., Aralis, H., Lester, P., Escudero, P., & Kataoka, S. (2017). Adapting and Implementing a School-Based Resilience-Building Curriculum Among Low-Income Racial and Ethnic Minority Students. Contemporary School Psychology, 1-17.
Lai, K., Guo, S., Ijadi-Maghsoodi, R., Puffer, M., & Kataoka, S. H. (2016). Bringing Wellness to Schools: Opportunities for and Challenges to Mental Health Integration in School-Based Health Centers. Psychiatric Services, 67(12), 1328-1333.
Ijadi-Maghsoodi, R., Cook, M., Barnert, E. S., Gaboian, S., & Bath, E. (2016). Understanding and responding to the needs of commercially sexually exploited youth: recommendations for the mental health provider. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 25(1), 107-122.
Ijadi-Maghsoodi, R., Todd, E. J., & Bath, E. P. (2014). Commercial sexual exploitation of children and the role of the child psychiatrist. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 53(8), 825-829.
Joshi, S. V., Ijadi-Maghsoodi, R., Merrell, S. E., Dunlap, P., Hartley, S. N., & Kataoka, S. (2015). Shared learning in community-academic partnerships: Addressing the needs of schools. Partnerships for Mental Health (pp. 163-178). Springer International Publishing.
Sheryl Kataoka
Sheryl Kataoka, MD, MSHS

Dr. Kataoka is a Professor-in-Residence at the UCLA Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as well as the Training Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship. Dr. Kataoka is also the site Principal Investigator for the Treatment and Services Adaptation Center for Resiliency, Hope, and Wellness in Schools for the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. She has received numerous awards, including the Sydney Berman Award for School Interventions from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in 2009 and the Jeanne Spurlock Minority Fellowship Program Achievement Award from the American Psychiatric Association in 2013.

Throughout her career, she has utilized community-partnered research that combines evidence-based interventions and local knowledge to implement innovative ways of delivering services to vulnerable populations. As a child psychiatrist and health services researcher, she has been investigating the implementation of evidence-based early interventions in schools and examining social determinants of mental health such as educational outcomes and violence exposure. Her research has led to a greater understanding of the role of schools in decreasing disparities in mental health care for ethnic minority children and their families.

 

Recent Publications:
Acuña, M. A., & Kataoka, S. (2017). Family Communication Styles and Resilience among Adolescents. Social Work, 1-9.
Lai, K., Guo, S., Ijadi-Maghsoodi, R., Puffer, M., & Kataoka, S. H. (2016). Bringing Wellness to Schools: Opportunities for and Challenges to Mental Health Integration in School-Based Health Centers. Psychiatric Services, 67(12), 1328-1333.
Woodbridge, M. W., Sumi, W. C., Thornton, S. P., Fabrikant, N., Rouspil, K. M., Langley, A. K., & Kataoka, S. H. (2016). Screening for trauma in early adolescence: Findings from a diverse school district. School Mental Health 8(1), 89-105.
Baweja, S., Santiago, C. D., Vona, P., Pears, G., Langley, A., & Kataoka, S. (2016) Improving Implementation of a School-Based Program for Traumatized Students: Identifying Factors that Promote Teacher Support and Collaboration. School Mental Health 8(1), 120-131.
Santiago, C. D., Fuller, A. K., Lennon, J. M., & Kataoka, S. H. (2016). Parent perspectives from participating in a family component for CBITS: Acceptability of a culturally informed school-based program. Psychological trauma: theory, research, practice, and policy, 8(3), 325.
Hydon, S., Wong, M., Langley, A. K., Stein, B. D., & Kataoka, S. H. (2015). Preventing secondary traumatic stress in educators. Child and adolescent psychiatric clinics of North America, 24(2), 319-333.
Audra Langley
Audra Langley, PhD

Dr. Langley received her doctorate degree from Virginia Tech. Dr. Langley serves as the Director of UCLA TIES for Families, the Director of Training for the Center for Resiliency, Hope, and Wellness in Schools and as Chair of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network School Committee. In addition, she is a Professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior.

Dr. Langley’s areas of expertise include evidence-based treatments for children exposed to traumatic events and cognitive behavioral therapy for children and adolescents with PTSD, anxiety, and OCD, especially within underserved populations. Dr. Langley has worked to increase access to mental health care for the ethnically and socioeconomically diverse, including children in the child welfare system. She has written four treatment manuals and numerous research papers during her career, and co-developed an adoption-specific psychotherapy intervention.

Recent Publications:
Baweja, S., Santiago, C. D., Vona, P., Pears, G., Langley, A., & Kataoka, S. (2016). Improving implementation of a school-based program for traumatized students: Identifying factors that promote teacher support and collaboration. School Mental Health, 8(1), 120-131.
Edelstein, S. B., Gonzalez, A., Langley, A. K., Waterman, J., Paasivirta, M., & Paczkowski, E. (2017). Preparing and partnering with families to support the adoption of children from foster care. Adoption Quarterly, 20(1), 119-133.
Gonzalez, A., Monzon, N., Solis, D., Jaycox, L., & Langley, A. K. (2016). Trauma exposure in elementary school children: Description of screening procedures, level of exposure, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. School Mental Health, 8(1), 77-88.
Hoff, A. L., Kendall, P. C., Langley, A., Ginsburg, G., Keeton, C., Compton, S., ... & Suveg, C. (2015). Developmental differences in functioning in youth with social phobia. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 1-9.
Langley, A. K., Gonzalez, A., Sugar, C. A., Solis, D., & Jaycox, L. (2015). Bounce back: Effectiveness of an elementary school-based intervention for multicultural children exposed to traumatic events. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83(5), 853.
Woodbridge, M. W., Sumi, W. C., Thornton, S. P., Fabrikant, N., Rouspil, K. M., Langley, A. K., & Kataoka, S. H. (2016). Screening for trauma in early adolescence: Findings from a diverse school district. School Mental Health, 8(1), 89-105.
Helen Lavretsky
Helen Lavretsky, MD

Dr. Lavretsky is a geriatric psychiatrist, the Semel Scholar in Integrative Mental Health, and a Professor In-Residence in the Department of Psychiatry at UCLA. Her research interests include treatment of depression in older adults and in dementia caregivers as well as the use of integrative mind-body medicine to treat and prevent the development of cognitive and mood disorders in later life. Her work has garnered numerous awards and distinctions, including the 2001-2007 and 2010-2016 Research Career Development awards from the National Institute of Mental Health; and the 2016-2021 from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. She is the UCLA Principle Investigator on the multi-site OPTIMUM study funded by the PCORI that aims to develop  a new strategy for treatment-resistant geriatric depression.  She is also the author of the book “Resilience and Aging” and the editor of the book “Complementary and Integrative Therapies for Mental Health and Aging.”

 

Recent Publications:
Eyre H, Siddarth P, Cyr N, Yang H, Cole S, Forbes M, Lavretsky H. Comparing
the Immune-Genomic Effects of Vilazodone and Paroxetine in Late-Life Depression:
A Pilot Study. Pharmacopsychiatry. 2017 Apr 25. doi: 10.1055/s-0043-107033. [Epub
ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28444658.
 
Lavretsky H. Hallucinations Predict Relapse After Discontinuation of
Risperidone in Patients With Alzheimer's Disease and Psychosis or Agitation. Am J
Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 1;174(4):307-308. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.16111314.
PubMed PMID: 28366091.
 
Arandjelovic K, Eyre HA, Lavretsky H. Clinicians' Views on Treatment-Resistant
Depression: 2016 Survey Reports. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Oct;24(10):913-7.
doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.05.010. Epub 2016 May 18. PubMed PMID: 27591914.
 
Lavretsky H. Lifestyle Medicine for Prevention of Cognitive Decline: Focus on
Green Tea. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Oct;24(10):890-2. doi:
10.1016/j.jagp.2016.08.002. Epub 2016 Aug 5. PubMed PMID: 27591162.
 
Eyre HA, Acevedo B, Yang H, Siddarth P, Van Dyk K, Ercoli L, Leaver AM, Cyr
NS, Narr K, Baune BT, Khalsa DS, Lavretsky H. Changes in Neural Connectivity and
Memory Following a Yoga Intervention for Older Adults: A Pilot Study. J
Alzheimers Dis. 2016;52(2):673-84. doi: 10.3233/JAD-150653. PubMed PMID:
27060939; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4927889.
 
Lavretsky H. Intervention Research in Late-Life Depression: Challenges and
Opportunities. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;24(1):6-10. doi:
10.1016/j.jagp.2015.10.011. Epub 2015 Nov 4. PubMed PMID: 26743099.
 
Yang, H., Leaver, A. M., Siddarth, P., Paholpak, P., Ercoli, L., Cyr, N. M. S., ... & Lavretsky, H. (2016). Neurochemical and neuroanatomical plasticity following memory training and yoga interventions in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 8.
James McCraken
James McCraken, MD

Dr. McCracken joined the faculty at UCLA in 1987.  Currently, Dr. McCracken is the Joseph Campbell Professor of Child Psychiatry and the Director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UCLA’s Semel Institute.  In addition, he is the Principal Investigator and Project Director of UCLA’s Translational Research to Enhance Cognitive Control, a multidisciplinary center funded by the National Institute of Mental Health that investigates cognitive dysfunction in pediatric psychiatric disorders including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The center works to identify and test novel treatments and interventions for these cognitive deficits.  Dr. McCracken is also testing innovative treatments for children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and anxiety disorders.

Dr. McCracken has published over 150 scientific articles in the realm of child psychiatry and has received numerous awards and distinctions over the course of his career, including the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Young Psychiatrist Research Award.

Recent Publications:
Nguyen, T. V., Lew, J., Albaugh, M. D., Botteron, K. N., Hudziak, J. J., Fonov, V. S., ... & McCracken, J. T. (2017). Sex-specific associations of testosterone with prefrontal-hippocampal development and executive function. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 76, 206-217.
Scahill, L., Dimitropoulos, A., McDougle, C. J., Aman, M. G., Feurer, I. D., McCracken, J. T., ... & Hallett, V. (2014). Children's Yale–Brown obsessive compulsive scale in autism spectrum disorder: Component structure and correlates of symptom checklist. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 53(1), 97-107.
Scahill, L., McCracken, J. T., King, B. H., Rockhill, C., Shah, B., Politte, L., ... & Page, C. (2015). Extended-release guanfacine for hyperactivity in children with autism spectrum disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 172(12), 1197-1206.
Vitiello, B., Lazzaretto, D., Yershova, K., Abikoff, H., Paykina, N., McCracken, J. T., ... & Wigal, T. (2015). Pharmacotherapy of the preschool ADHD treatment study (PATS) children growing up. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 54(7), 550-556.
David Merrill
David Merrill, MD, PhD

Dr. Merrill received his medical training from UC San Diego School of Medicine in 2004 and completed his internship, residency, and fellowship at UCLA. Additionally, he received his PhD from UC San Diego Neurosciences Graduate Program in 2002. He is an Adult and Geriatric Psychiatrist at UCLA with a background in neuroscience and an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the Semel Insitute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. His research interests include memory, cognition, and the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. He has received many awards and distinctions during his career, including the Junior Investigator Award from the International College of Geriatric Psychoneuropharmacology in 2011. 

Recent Publications:
Burggren AC, Mahmood Z, Harrison TM, Siddarth P, Miller KJ, Small GW, Merrill
DA, Bookheimer SY. Hippocampal thinning linked to longer TOMM40 poly-T variant
lengths in the absence of the APOE ε4 variant. Alzheimers Dement. 2017
Jul;13(7):739-748. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2016.12.009. Epub 2017 Feb 7. PubMed PMID:
28183529.
 
Raji CA, Merrill DA, Barrio JR, Omalu B, Small GW. Progressive Focal Gray
Matter Volume Loss in a Former High School Football Player: A Possible Magnetic
Resonance Imaging Volumetric Signature for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. Am J
Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Oct;24(10):784-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.07.018. Epub
2016 Jul 28. PubMed PMID: 27567184.
 
Emerson ND, Merrill DA, Shedd K, Bilder RM, Siddarth P. Effects of an employee
exercise programme on mental health. Occup Med (Lond). 2017 Mar 1;67(2):128-134.
doi: 10.1093/occmed/kqw120. PubMed PMID: 27552821.
 
Merrill DA, Siddarth P, Raji CA, Emerson ND, Rueda F, Ercoli LM, Miller KJ,
Lavretsky H, Harris LM, Burggren AC, Bookheimer SY, Barrio JR, Small GW.
Modifiable Risk Factors and Brain Positron Emission Tomography Measures of
Amyloid and Tau in Nondemented Adults with Memory Complaints. Am J Geriatr
Psychiatry. 2016 Sep;24(9):729-37. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.05.007. Epub 2016 May
13. PubMed PMID: 27421618; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5003686.
 
Raji CA, Merrill DA, Eyre H, Mallam S, Torosyan N, Erickson KI, Lopez OL,
Becker JT, Carmichael OT, Gach HM, Thompson PM, Longstreth WT, Kuller LH.
Longitudinal Relationships between Caloric Expenditure and Gray Matter in the
Cardiovascular Health Study. J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;52(2):719-29. doi:
10.3233/JAD-160057. PubMed PMID: 26967227; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4927887.